The Chachapoya people and the Empire of the Incas

Dorset Centre for the Creative Arts Middle Farm way, Poundbury, Dorset DT1 3AR

01305 764 713
sarah_drew@dorsetcentreforthecreativearts.co.uk
http://dorsetcreativeartclasses.co.uk/

Friday 29 September 2017
6.30 - 9.00
Admission Fee: £10.00
Booking essential
Phone 0800 808 9440 or 01305 764723

In 1889 the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch went with his friend Paul Gauguin to an exhibition at the Trocadero in Paris. What they saw there was archaeological material belonging to the Chachapoya culture from ancient Peru. Amongst the exhibits were a number of well-preserved mummies that a Frenchman who had recently travelled through Peru had removed intact from the sarcophagi in which they had originally been placed. The archaeologist, writer and broadcaster David Drew will talk about this episode and what is known of the history of the Chachapoya, who lived on the Amazonian, jungle side of the Andes in what is now northern Peru.
The talk will cover something of the history of the Incas, the nature of their empire and what we now know about their eventual conquest of the Chachapoya. And it will describe one of the greatest archaeological finds in Peru of recent years  the discovery of a whole series of Chachapoya mummies, placed in little burial houses on a cliff face, surrounded by cloud forest and above the remote and very beautiful Lake of the Condorsa
 

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The Chachapoya people and the Empire of the Incas

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Visual Arts South West

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